Back to All Events

SIUKatowice: The Brain in a Nutshell

  • Medical University of Silesia 40-752 Katowice Poland (map)

GUEST SPEAKERS: DR BERT SAKMANN, PAWEL SOLUCH, JAKUB BANIA

A3 LECTURE HALL, MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF SILESIA (5:30 PM - 8:30 PM)

Dr. Bert Sakmann - Nobel prize co-winner in physiology for discoveries concerning the function of single ion channels in cells for which was invented the patch clamp technique, inaugural director of the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, and head of the Research Group “Digital Neuroanatomy”.

Pawel Soluch - CEO of NeuroDevice, neuropsychologist, graduate and employee of Warsaw Medical University.

Jakub Bania - hypnotherapist you based in Krakow who uses his hypnosis as a therapeutic technique to help people change their emotions, and alter destructive habits and patterns.

The brain, a complex object, consisting of 100 billion neurons and weighing a kilogram and a half, is able to store an amount of information that has no equal. With its wealth of knowledge and experience, it is no wonder that by constantly interacting with the physical and social environment, the brain drives behavior, individual and collective choices, creating the foundation upon which is embedded the evolved methods of communication and interaction, framing the political, economic and industrial choices of our mindsets. Increasing our understanding of the brain and improving the methods to study would enable scientists to develop an alternate reality for brain pathologies, a reality opening the medical world to a plethora of diagnoses, technology, knowledge and even cure. Research will also help us find out more about normal human behaviour and mental wellbeing, and can help develop artificial intelligence. By gathering knowledge about our very own powerhouse of knowledge, we can alter our psychological, sociological, and biological realities; the implications of this continuous curiosity are astounding and ever more pressing as technology evolves. As well as treating illnesses, research could also lead to better understanding of how we learn, allowing us to optimise our own intelligence, thereby opening a gateway for an optimistic cognitive progression.