Opinion

Brave New Diagnostics: The Convergence of Genomic Sequencing and Machine Learning

Almost a century ago, the novel Brave New World portrayed a future in which technology and medicine are integral parts of our lives. How far have we come? How far will we go? This opinion article discusses our advancement in disease diagnostics, with special focus on the interlinks between genome sequencing and machine learning.

The story of Big Pharma in India- Do patients or patents win?

Does the justice system oversee big pharma and its drug patent culture? Who does this culture benefit the most- pharma or the patients? Here is a case study in India where the generic drug manufacturers won against a major pharma company, with many seeing this as a victory for patients in terms of drug afforadability. Read on this opinion piece here…

Diagnostic Radiology Guided by Machine Learning

Pneumonia affects hundreds of millions of people a year around the world and early detection of the disease is one of the most important preventative measures to bring the numbers down. CheXNet, a deep learning algorithm developed by scientists in Stanford, is one of the methods we can utilise machine learning for early detection of pneumonia. 

Cell Free Fetal DNA Testing- A non-invasive approach to prenatal screening

Cell free fetal DNA (cffDNA) circulating in maternal blood was discovered back in 1997. It now shows promise in being used for non-invasive pre-natal screening to detect fetal chromosomal abnormalities and more. Read here for insights on the efficacy and advantages of this technique. 

TCAR vs. Traditional Surgeries: Is TCAR A Promising Innovation?

Stroke is considered a pandemic because of the number of people affected every year around the world. Complications arising from methods traditionally used in treatment of blockage of arteries - an underlying cause - have led to the birth of TransCarotid Artery Revascularisation (TCAR) method. This article brings you all you want to know about this promising innovation.

Nanomedicine: A Look At Applications, Commercialisation and Featured Company MagForce

At their minuscule sizes of billionths of a metre, nanoparticles and their use in medicine brings about the field of nanomedicine, a field that carries a potential that is everything but minuscule. Read on to find out just what nanomedicine means and why it's of 'giga' importance.

Microfluidics in Medicine

From diagnosing diseases to growing organs in miniature environments to effective delivery of drugs to their targets, microfludics opens the door to a big world of potential in medicine. Read the last of our microfludics series to discover how the simple process of flowing liquids through microchannels can harbour an explosive innovative potential.

Microfluidics and Biological Research: The perfect partners?

Mimicking and understanding the environment molecules, cells and organs work in requires creative thinking and sublime engineering. Microfluidics technology is a product of such a process and makes it possible for researchers to achieve results that cannot be achieved by other means. Read the first instalment of our new 3-part series on microfluidics here to see what we mean.

The Powerful Combination of iPSC and CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing

Fixing genes, introducing them to a patient and making the patient's body accept the newly introduced genes are challenges we were not able to overcome until recently. Now, with the advance of genome editing techniques and the use of stem cells, we are closer than ever. Here we bring you the insight on how it would work to combine these two biological tools to fight disease.

Enterprising Women: How the Greek Financial Crisis Inspired a Startup

Spotting an unmet need and coming up with ideas to meet it are essential for the success of a startup. Where your ideas stem from, however, can be completely unrelated to your background and expertise. Dr. Denise Xifara was the guest of Enterprising Oxford recently and here we bring you the story of her, her doctorate in genetics, the Greek financial crisis and her startup Nupinion.

A Candidate For A Zika Virus Vaccine Passes Mice Trials. What’s Next?

Vaccination is the answer to tackle many diseases and the ongoing effort to prevent Zika virus infections is advancing. The Zika virus vaccine that was recently developed in mouse models raised hopes. So, how close are we to have a vaccine that will work in humans? Find out in this article.

Enterprising Women: An Insight from Dame Carol Robinson

The numbers by which women are represented in science, business and leadership positions always lead to debate. Entrepreneurship and the extent of female involvement fits right into the same picture. In March 2017, Enterprising Oxford hosted the Oxford professor Dame Carol Robinson at their "Enterprising Women" session. Our writer Sandra Ionescu was there to find out about the ups and downs of Carol's entrepreneurial adventure. Here is what Carol's inspirational talk covered.

Academic-Industrial Collaboration: How To Make It Work

Progress in modern scientific research is accomplished primarily by collaborative teamwork. In this piece that got shortlisted for the SIU-Naturejobs writing competition, University of Oxford PhD student Sofia D'Abrantes discusses the advantages of academic-industrial collaborations, her advice to foment successful partnerships and what you can do to encourage them.

Leaving Academia: It’s Okay, and Here is Why

In this next shortlisted piece from the SIU-Naturejobs writing competition, our Frankfurt division editorial lead Dejan Draschkow brings us his thoughts on leaving academia and why it's quite OK to do so because it doesn't have to mean steering away from what you love doing as a scientist. Read on for very useful tips on how to carry on outside of academia after your PhD.

Academia, Startups, Small Enterprises: Do I Need to Choose?

SIU and Naturejobs held a writing competition back in February. Our writers wrote about their opinions on career choices, life in academia versus industry and the option of starting a company for researchers. This week we will publish the articles that were shortlisted for the competition. In this first article, Holly Reeve, a postdoc from University of Oxford, brings us her thoughts on career choices, the challenges facing her and other researchers when it comes to getting ready for the next step and how academia and industry can learn from each other.

Brain Electric

Changes in the electrical activity of the nervous system cause debilitating symptoms in patients who suffer from chronic pain and neurological diseases like Parkinson's. Electrical stimulation of the nervous system is a very promising method to overcome these symptoms. In this SIU article we discuss how and why electrostimulation holds so much potential. 

Artificial Intelligence In Medicine: When Will My Marriage Counselling Be Done By A Robot?

Asking computers about your symptoms and getting diagnosed by them are not things that you might think would only happen in sci-fi movies any more. We are in the midst of much-improved healthcare, in the form of apps and other tools, which use Artificial Intelligence. But how much computer input are we talking about exactly? In this article we bring you the latest in AI technology in healthcare and discuss the implications.